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Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Business Spanish: Week 10

Image of a computer and tablet with the words Business Spanish Lesson Plans from Annie Abbott
by Ann Abbott

This week we have moved on to Chapter 9 in Éxito comercial: Marketing I. This is especially pertinent to our class because of the marketing projects that students are working on for La Línea and Spanish Advising. Here's what we'll do.

Lunes: Lectura comercial

This is a long, detailed reading. My goal with students is to pull out just a few main concepts and then illustrate them with examples.

1. Warm up. I began by asking students: Tell me one concept or one piece of information that stood out to you in this reading. We listened to a few of their answers. (I'm always impressed by what they take away from the course; these readings are not easy!)

2. Conversar sin parar. I like to start most of my classes by putting students into pairs, giving them a topic (or no topic!), setting the timer on my iPhone and telling them to hablar cinco minutos sin parar. It is a good way for them to get to know each other, use their Spanish and prepare for the speaking they will do in the rest in the class. But more importantly, I remind them often that in business situations you must be able to make small talk with people who you sometimes have never spoken to before. So getting back to today's lesson: students had to first identify the last few purchases they had made, and then they had to talk to each other about the marketing that had gone into their decisions to make that purchase. There were a lot of food purchases--and a lot of those were based on promotions and discounts.

3. Social marketing. I pulled this term out of the reading and focused on it for a bit. First we defined what it is: associating your brand with a certain social/cultural cause. For example, Yoplait's connection with breast cancer awareness creates a positive image for their target market. (Everybody eats yogurt; everybody supports finding a cure for breast cancer.) Then I explained that you have to find a cause that resonates with your target audience. So for example, if your target audience is immigrants, then you can probably safely associate your brand with political causes about comprehensive immigration reform. They likely support that cause. But many people do not. That's why it's so important to know your target audience inside and out. Then we looked at this example of social marketing from Goya Foods and analyzed it: how does it reflect the values of Goya's target market?

4. Localization. I then asked students to compare the Goya Foods Facebook page with Goya Puerto Rico's page. What are some of the very specific ways in which the two pages are both the same and different. OJO: make sure that students understand that it's not just a matter of Spanish versus English; it's the *kind* of Spanish that is used. And of course there are many other differences that go beyond language.

5. Packaging. I wanted to really emphasize to students that marketing is much more than just the ads and Facebook pages that you create. So zoomed in on packaging as a marketing tool. 

For our first example we looked at soap. These two photos show the same product: soap. They're selling soap. But what are they really selling? What kind of experience? What kind of values? What kind of self image?


Then we moved to another example of packaging so important that it has become an icon, a piece of art much like Andy Warhol's focus on Campbell's Soup cans: Café Bustelo.
I asked students to raise their hand if they have an account on Instagram. To those students I told them to open their app and to search for #CafeBustelo. To the other students (only a few) I told them to go to Flickr.com and search for Cafe Bustelo. I gave them several minutes to look, click, explore. Then we analyzed how the packaging was used in their marketing. Here are a few things that stood out: their packaging is so striking that they have created other merchandise around it; the colors of yellow and red are tightly associated with their product; after people have consumed the product, they keep and reuse the packaging (to store paint brushes, tools, pencils, etc.); it is part of a lifestyle. What else could you and your students come up with?

6. Bilingual social media marketing. We didn't have time in class to look at Café Bustelo's Facebook page, but it is a wonderful example of truly bilingual Facebook marketing. If you have time, explore it and think about how you and your students could analyze and emulate their work.

Miércoles: Lectura cultural

Again, we are working on Chapter 9 of Éxito comercial. Since we ended the previous class with an analysis of Café Bustelo, I will begin this class with a commercial from Café Bustelo. In fact, during the class we will watch a series of commercials for coffee with the sole intent of analyzing the very specific cultural components of each one. My hope is that students walk away from the lesson today with a very clear idea that one does not market to "Latinos" or "Latin Americans." Instead, you market to a very specific segment of that market, and that you must know that segment very well in order to speak to them effectively.

Here is a link to the series of commercials I use with the students. And by the way, I use that photo of me in  our kitchen in Italy in this way: I ask them what this photo has to do with coffee. They recognize the coffee mug immediately (it's very American anyway). But very few students even "see" the cafetera on the stove. It doesn't register to them because many of them have never seen it before.

And here are a few extra resources about coffee and cultural differences that I have recently encountered:

Viernes: Taller de asesoría

The team of students working with La Línea will meet with them at the Y. Unfortunately, I will be out of town on Friday for a CIC meeting in Chicago. I will put one student in charge of our Spanish Advising team and expect them to still meet up in our classroom and create/edit/critique their Facebook posts for next week. And by the way, I'm so happy with the videos that they are creating about Spanish courses. They gain more reach and receive way more views than other posts.

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Monday, October 19, 2015

Fourth-semester Spanish: Week 9

My lesson plans are based on my textbook Día a día: de lo personal a lo profesional

by Ann Abbott

This is the week when everything the students have been working on culminates. This is a little later than other courses, but I don't think that's a problem. For me, it gives them more time to really use the language before being tested.

Martes: Proyecto 1, una composición

Last week students worked on the short writing assignments of the section titled "La expresión escrita" en Chapters 1-3. Now they will spend the class period working on the longer piece of writing from whichever chapter they choose.
  • Chapter 1, p. 44. The short writing assignment (p. 43) was to write a negative review. If students choose to work on this topic, they will change perspectives and write a professional response to the bad review they previously wrote. 
  • Chapter 2, p. 90. The short writing assignment was a list. We talked about the trapped Chilean miners, and they had to write a list of five things they would have wanted to be dropped down to them if they would have been one of the miners. If students choose to work on this topic, they will change perspectives and write a letter down to one of the trapped miners.
  • Chapter 3, pp. 135-36. The short writing assignment was to write a very brief scenario and very brief message to convey an emotional message (p. 135, 3-52). If students choose to work on this topic, they will switch from informal language to formal language. They will write an email to a professor, asking for a letter of recommendation.
These are the requirements for the final composition:
  • 1 full page, double space. (Only use one line to write your name; start the composition on the second line.)
  • Times New Roman, 12 point, 1 inch margins all around.
And this is the schedule for the composition:
  • Today. Spend the entire class period thinking, planning, writing, editing, asking questions, etc. The goal is to have a complete rough draft.
  • Next Tuesday. We will dedicate 10 minutes at the end of class to questions and edits.
  • Next Thursday. Hand in the composition. I want a hard copy in class and an electronic copy in MySpanishLab (or Compass, I need to see how to set that up.)

Jueves

Students will take the exam. It will be exactly like the activities in the MySpanishLab that they have done all semester as homework. To review for the exam, they can simply review those activities.

For their project (based on the activities in the section of each chapter titled "Actividades culminantes"), students will

Sunday, October 18, 2015

Business Spanish: Week 9

Photo of a computer and tablet with the words Business Spanish Lesson Plans from Annie Abbott
by Ann Abbott

This week we will work again on Chapter 6 of Éxito comercial: La oficina. Last week we covered the Lectura comercial and the Lectural cultural. This week we will do the readings about the countries and the minicaso práctico.

Lunes: ¿Qué sabes de...?

This reading is about Costa Rica and Panama. I'll divide the students into the following groups:
  1. Costa Rica: Export. You must advise a US business person who is interested in creating an export business to Costa Rica. Advise him/her on what products/services he/she could successfully export and why. What risks/benefits should she/he anticipate? What specific steps should he/she take before making a final decision?
  2. Costa Rica: Import. You must advise a US business person who is interested in creating a business with import(s) from Costa Rica. Advise him/her on what products/services he/she could successfully import and why. What risks/benefits should she/he anticipate? What specific steps should he/she take before making a final decision?
  3. Costa Rica: Business Travel. Prepare the complete travel package (tickets, itinerary and detailed pre-departure instructions) for two Chicago business people (one male, one female) who want to spend three full days exploring a variety of import/export opportunities. Present them with two options: a deluxe travel package ($$$) and an economy travel package ($).
  4. The same three topics with Panama.
(Students did a great job. They worked hard during the class period. I pushed them to look up prices of shipping, research rules and regulations on certain products, look up information about local Chambers of Commerces, etc.)

Miércoles: Minicaso práctico

Three students will be the facilitators of the case analysis, p. 202. They will spend ~12 minutes on discussion and analysis with their small groups. They will then have ~5 minutes to come to a concrete decision that they will present to the protagonist(s) of the case. While the facilitators finish filling out the rubric, the other students will form new groups to compare/contrast their discussions and strategize for their turns as facilitators. Finally, each group will very briefly present their conclusion.

Viernes: Taller de asesoría

My team is doing a great job on the Spanish Advising - Illinois Facebook page. But I think they're getting a little too comfortable. 

Last week I shook things up by telling them all that they needed to create an original video about courses on the spring timetable. (Because I have observed over the years that my students are terrific at scouring the internet for information to use in posts but not as good at taking the next step at creating original content.)

This week I will ask them to look at this trove of quote images. Using their creativity and thinking about what "Emily" (their ideal client) would like, I'd like them all to create at least two. They can continue using PowerPoint to edit their photos the way that I have showed them previously. Or they can try something new with an online photo-editing site: PicMonkey or Canva.

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Questions about Incorporating Professional Content in Basic Language Courses



by Ann Abbott

Webinars are a funny thing. You talk to your screen, and you have no idea if anyone is listening! But I did get positive feedback about a webinar I gave yesterday as part of a series that Pearson offered called Speaking About Webinar Week.

My talk was "Student Career Concerns and Aspirations: Integrating Languages for Specific Purposes into Basic Language Programs." The slides for the talks should be available at that page in the next week or so, but I'll include my slides from SlideShare toward the end of this post.

As I was talking, I couldn't see the questions that people were typing. So I wasn't sure if anything I was saying resonated with people. Turns out, it did! I received the list of questions that were posed, which is a good thing because I didn't have a chance to answer them all during the time allotted for the webinar.

I'll answer them here.

First, there were several questions about the activities that I shared. So let me start with just some basic information.

Basic information

  • Level. It was designed for fourth semester Spanish courses, but we have found that it works well in bridge courses, too (you know, that course that is intended to transition students from the basic language program to the major and minor courses). 
  • Book structure. As I said in the webinar, many textbooks dedicate one chapter to careers and professions. Our approach, instead, was to dedicate one half of each chapter to the professional realm. So it comes up over and over, reinforcing the idea that learning Spanish now is important for your future. There are six chapters.
  • Professions. Each chapter focuses on a different profession or professional field. Since there are six chapters there are six fields:
    • Tourism and hospitality.
    • Health professions.
    • Business.
    • Social services/International services.
    • Artistic/Creative fields
    • Education
  • Course syllabus. I'm happy to share my course syllabus and calendar with you. 
  • Hybrid. On my campus, this course is worth four credits, and we teach it as a hybrid. So each week, students spend two hours doing online work from the textbook and together we spend two hours doing communicative, active-learning activities in class. For their online work I assign the following work within MySpanishLab:
    • All the "e" activities within the textbook.
    • All the workbook (or SAM) activities. These activities move from input, to structured output, to short free discourse to longer connected discourse. It gives them good practice with the vocabulary and grammar so that when we do the communicative activities in class, they already know (not perfected, though!) those items and can put them to use. (Right now I'm a little overwhelmed with grading the "free response" activities, so I think I'll handle those differently next time.)
  • Community Service Learning. Because I am a huge proponent of Spanish community service learning, I included it in this course, too. But they only have to do one experience in the community. And the stakes are pretty low (except my best speakers, including heritage speakers, will work at the parent-teacher conferences at a local high school). This is my first time using CSL in the basic language program, so if it all goes well (it is going well so far), I can expand it. You can see the opportunities at this link.
Now, the other questions!

1. Do you interact with other departments/disciplines in regards to teaching professional Spanish at your institution? Is there some team-teaching, etc? Do other language departments at your institution also have a "professional language" approach, or is Spanish the forerunner? Do other languages emphasize other professions?

These are such good, important questions, and here is my sad answer: No.

I do interact with other disciplines because I am part of a campus-wide group of faculty who teach entrepreneurship, but unfortunately there is not much collaboration on teaching, and because everything I do in my teaching is in Spanish, that tends to exclude me.

As for other languages, there might be some feeble attempts going on. This is not meant as an insult to any individual faculty! I only mean this in the sense that it certainly not a departmental priority in any language department that I know of.

2. Do you have any recommendations for Spanish Business Online? Also, have you heard of professional track-oriented majors in Spanish or other languages?

I answered this during the webinar: my friend Prof. Maida Watson at Florida International University teaches Business Spanish online and has resources to share. I encourage you to contact her and to look for her publications on the topic. But if you are interested in Business Spanish in general, I am sharing my weekly lesson plans on my blog. Here's an example with this week's lesson plans. (I need to go back and post some of the earlier weeks.) 

3. Can you recommend a specific text for "Spanish for Health Occupations"? 

I have never taught that course, but I have heard a lot of people use A su salud.

4. Any recommendations for Spanish for Engineers (books or activities)?

No, I don't have any recommendations for that, either. I do know that the University of Rhode Island offers a highly successful International Engineering program that fully integrates language learning. Be sure to check out their program and people.

In general, though, I would approach it this way: I would ask some engineers what their day-to-day activities look like, and I would build my materials that way. In other words, I wouldn't try to teach lots and lots of technical vocabulary in Spanish. Rather, I would focus on things like clear communications within a team; interacting with designers; problem solving; etc.

5. Have you had success promoting this approach as a way to shore up languages at your respective schools? Are colleagues outside of the humanities receptive? Thanks, this was a very helpful webinar. Lots of food for thought.

I'm glad you found it useful! I'm going to be honest, though: until language departments decide to fully embrace languages for specific purposes as a complement to their other courses (not as a replacement), it probably won't do as much as it should to shore up the major. Many places now have a minor in Spanish for X or Spanish for the Professions. But if these kinds of courses are just elective "add-ons" instead of fully contributing to the major, we're still in a precarious situation all the way around. But if you have ideas, I'd love to hear from you.

Contact me!

I'd love to hear more from you and share ideas. You can email me at arabott@illinois.edu, call me at the office at 217-333-6714, friend me on Facebook or message me on Twitter (@AnnAbbott).


Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Business Spanish: Week 8

Photo of a computer and tablet with the words Business Spanish Lesson Plans from Annie Abbott
by Ann Abbott

This week we're back to working from the textbook, Éxito comercial. We´re on Chapter 6 La oficina.


Lunes: lectura comercial

1. We began with three minutes of "conversar sin parar" in Spanish like I often do. I paired students from different social media consulting teams and asked them to share about their experiences. As a follow-up, I asked the students what they are learning. Silence. I finally received three answers, that showed me that they are learning about things that go beyond "just" marketing. That is good!

2. Then I put students in groups of three. I gave them the following scenario:
The three of you are moving to Barcelona, Spain to begin your own business in bilingual social media marketing (just like you are doing in this class). You have a budget of 4,000 Euros to set up your office space with all the necessary equipment. Use Amazon and Apple in Spain to price your products. You also need to choose the best office space, but rent is not included in your 4,000 Euro budget for office supplies.
Students had fifteen minutes to work on this, and they were very engaged!

3. I emphasized that there are some businesses that they can start with very little money. But one constant in business is change. So I told them to go back to their plans and budgets and recalculate according to the following.
  • Business is going well so you hire someone else. This person has a wheel chair. What office supplies do you need to buy to accommodate this employee? First students watch this video about how to talk about people with disabilities. Then they watch part of this video about daily obstacles for people in wheelchairs
  • Business continues to grow, so you hire another person. This person is blind. Will your current office space work? What modifications will you need to make to your office supplies and office space? I'll ask all students to go outside to the hallway and then to walk back to their seats with their eyes closed. Then they need to do this activity about the office space. 
  • If there is time I will show them this video about accessibility issues for people with intellectual/cognitive disabilities.
  • Suddenly, business drops. You let go the two new people. Now you need to let one of the original partners (one of the three of you) go. How will you go about making this decision? What will your criteria be? This was awkward! But I'm glad that they had to think it through because this is also a common business scenario.
All in all, I think it was a good class. Students had to apply the vocabulary and concepts from the textbook's Lectura comercial to a specific situation.

Miércoles: lectura cultural

This reading focuses on "El hombre, la mujer y el empleo." Based on Mary Long's recommendations in her chapter titled "Teaching Gender for the Multicultural Workplace" within the book Teaching Gender through Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Texts and Cultures, I will do three things:
  1. Explore a website. I will ask students to explore Mujeres de empresa and analyze the information it contains. What impression does it give you of Spanish speaking business women? (I suspect it will be that they are concerned about the same things any business person would be.)
  2. Provide biographies of Spanish, Latin American, and Latina women executives. I will refocus this slightly to highlight female leaders, even if they are not business executives. 
3. Interviews with Executives. Finally, I will ask students to watch Cultural Interviews with Latin American and Spanish Executives, the section on ¨Social Situations¨ and ¨Machismo.¨

Viernes: taller de asesoría

As always, we´ll analyze the posts from last week to see what worked and didn´t. We´ll edit their posts for next week. And we´ll add a new challenge. (Last week it was to incorporate at least one original video.)



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Sunday, October 11, 2015

Business Spanish: Week 7

Photo of a computer and tablet with the words Business Spanish Lesson Plans from Annie Abbott
Week 7 of my "Business Spanish" class
by Ann Abbott

I'm juggling a lot of things and several important, looming deadlines. So I'm just going to jump right into it.

Week 7 was great! We began work on the Networking Project for the course. (I'll describe the entire project in more detail later.) Here's what we did.

Lunes

I told students that we were going to be working on this project, and that I would give more details later. In general, though, 

Final goal

They will "cold call" (or cold contact via the Internet) three professionals and invite them to Skype into our class during the last week of the semester. They can talk to us about their work, their path from college student to professional and their use (or not) of Spanish. In order to accomplish that:

Today's goal
  • Research. I gave my current students a list of my former students whose careers might interest them. I assigned each student someone on the list (some students had to double up). they spent about 15 minutes in class researching this person on-line.
  • Pitch. They then had a few more minutes to prepare a pitch. I explained to them that they were all going to have to stand in front of the class and "pitch" the person they had researched as one of the three--only three!--people who we were going to invite to Skype with us. 
  • What is a pitch? I gave them a formula for preparing a pitch and illustrated it with an example.
    • Problem. What is the problem you are addressing? This must be a problem that matters! And it must matter to the people to whom you are pitching. (If you are pitching to venture capitalists, they might not feel the problem personally, but they should understand clearly that this a significant problem for a lot of people who would be willing to pay to have it solved with your product/service.)
    • Current solution. This is where you acknowledge the competition (if there is any). You describe why the current solution is inadequate. It might be too expensive. Too far away. Too complicated. Inaccurate. Low quality. Unreliable. Etc.
    • Your solution. Wow them with your solution. What is it? How is it better? How will it solve people's problems in a way that makes their lives better?
    • Example. Some students found it difficult to match that formula to this kind of pitch. Sot this is the example I gave (or something like it...). "Problem: May Spanish students also care deeply about social issues, but they don't have a clear idea about how to combine those two passions into a career path. Current solution: The Career Services Center has great resources, but students still need more specific advice. Your solution: If X person talks to us, we can find out how she managed to build a career that combines a passion for environmental issues and Spanish.
Students did a great job, although I noticed that some of them could benefit from learning higher-order Google search methods.

Miércoles

  • PreparationI gave the students about five minutes to refine and practice their pitch. I told them that I wanted them to come as close to three minutes as possible, not one minute or one and half minutes.
  • Notes. Each student had to take notes while the other students were pitching so that in the end they could vote on the top three.
  • PitchesEach student (or pair of students) had three minutes to stand at the front of the class and pitch.  
  • Vote. We finished with the pitches just a few minutes before the end of class. They took out a piece of paper, listed their top three choices, and left the paper on my desk. I posted the results on our Compass page.
Now, I need to help them prepare a brief but potent message to send to the three professionals, asking them to join us via Skype (or another method).

I'll be honest, there were two main weaknesses in the pitches (though several of them were very, very strong).
  • TimeThe majority of students didn't come close to using the full three minutes. I know that can be hard to judge, but managing time wisely is so important when you are preparing and giving a presentation! I'll talk to them about that.
  • Persuasiveness. The majority of students abandoned the notion (and the formula) of the pitch. They mostly provided a thorough summary/description of the person and their career trajectory. That's very different than pitching. Again, I'll have to work on that with them.

Viernes

Fridays are always our social media marketing workshop. I worked with the "Spanish Advising - Illinois" team while the team for "La Línea" met at the YMCA, as usual. These are the things I went over with my team:
  • Client feedback. She's happy with their work!
  • New marketing campaigns. She also gave them two things that she would like them to work on. I formed to "sub-teams" to work on the following topics. I also told them that I wanted to see at least one post for each topic that was an original video.
    • Help "Emily" (their ideal reader) improve her oral proficiency while she prepares for study abroad.
    • Promote the "stand-alone" or "non-standard" Spanish courses: SPAN 208 Oral Spanish, SPAN 232 Spanish in the Community and SPAN 332 Spanish & Entrepreneurship: Languages, Cultures & Communities. The spring schedule is now available, and students are beginning to plan their classes/schedules. Use this time to promote these classes so that students will enroll.
  • Team processes. I also repeated that I wanted our timing to change. They should come to class on Fridays with their posts for the next week already prepared so that we can use the time in class for critique and editing. If they start once they get into class, then we aren't using class time to maximize on the team's talents--and my presence. Several students had done that for this week, but not all. We need to get to 100% for next week.

More lesson plans

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Friday, October 9, 2015

Student Spotlight: Boris Pilev

by Ann Abbott

It was such a delight to get to know Boris Pilev when he was at Illinois and in my classes. He was such a warm, funny, friendly and smart guy who had a unique perspective on the world because he was originally from Bulgaria.

So when I opened my email and saw this item from my LinkedIn feed, I was just delighted. Please read to see how Boris did a unique combination of majors/minors and after graduation followed a path that led him to a position at Google that a lot of Spanish students would love to have. And, of course, see how he (and Google!) contributes to the Latino community.

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Student Spotlight: Arielle Anderson-Venerable

by Ann Abbott

I say this all the time: I love hearing from former students. So I was very happy to see Arielle's message in my inbox.

First, take a moment to see how professionally she wrote and formatted it.

Second, notice how she managed to combine her Spanish and engineering during her internship.

Finally, read through it again to see how well she makes connections and networks.

Hola Profesora Abbott,

This is Arielle Anderson, a past student of yours from your Spanish for Business Class in the Fall of 2013.  This December will mark the beginning of my last year towards a degree in Industrial Engineering.  This summer, I worked as an industrial engineering intern for a medical supplies manufacturing company and used Spanish on a daily basis communicating with warehouse workers and writing bilingual best practice documents.  Your class, which I have listed on my resume, was very helpful in this regard.  This aspect of my internship was the most interesting and fulfilling part.  If you wanted, we could meet and discuss it sometime. I think a lot of things would be interesting to touch on in your class that I took.

Anyway, I am reaching out to you because of some research I am doing related to my IE degree and restaurant operations.  I remembered from your class that we had made observations about your friend's restaurant's Facebook page called Seven Saints. (I actually ended up going out to eat there soon after, very good!) I was wondering if you could put me in contact with her if she would be interested. 

[I deleted the paragraph with the details of her project. --Ann]

If you wouldn't mind forwarding this to your friend or putting me in contact with her, I would really appreciate it. I hope all is well!

Sincerely,
Arielle Anderson-Venerable

You can learn a lot from Arielle! By studying Spanish along with engineering, she was able to work on interesting projects and add value for her employer. And by remembering details from the class we had together, she was able to make connections to her current research project which at first glance seem far apart.

I congratulate Arielle on her professionalism and hold her up to all my current students as a model of how to network with your professors and of how to make connections across your courses.

I invited her out for lunch, and this was her reply: "I have a lot more to share about my experience this summer. I was actually very surprised just how much my Spanish skills played into my engineering job this summer.  And I would love to have lunch and share my views on this experience with you and catch up."

So remember to network, be open, be professional and connect Spanish with whatever field you end up in.

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Spanish Community Service Learning Opportunities for 4th Semester Students

SPAN 142 students: here are your service learning opportunities.
by Ann Abbott

International Prep Academy

Thursday, October 15

The International Prep Academy is doing an event on the evening of October 15th to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. We are looking for some help in crowd control at the school and possibly setting up and making sure everything is running. I was wondering if it would be possible to advertise the event to your classes for students who want more volunteer hours. There will be food and entertainment, and I know the event last year was really successful.

My name is Nelly Alcala and I am a parent and vice president of our PTA at International Prep Academy in Champaign. My son is in Kat Kolumban's class and she mentioned that you have a class in which your students need to do volunteer hours. Our school is dual language and I think your students would make a good fit. We have a second annual event at our school in 2 weeks on Thursday October 15th and would need volunteers anywhere from 4:30-7:30pm. Please contact me via email or cell at 708-466-2675 to see if this is a possibility. I'd like to work with your students in the future for any other events as well.

Thank you, 
Nelly


Parent-Teacher Conferences at Champaign Central High School


Dear Dr. Abbott,

We are once again in need of volunteers to help with Spanish translating during our parent teacher conferences next month.  Last spring your student’s help was a godsend.

I am hoping you can help us out again this semester?  Our conferences are Thursday, October 29th from 5:00pm to 8:00pm and Friday, October 30th from 8:00am to 12:00pm.  If you know anyone who might be interested in helping, please have them email me at stratejo@champaignschools.org or call me at 217-351-3911. 

Thank you in advance for ANY assistance you can send my way…..

Joanie Strater

Joan I. Strater
Main Office Secretary
Champaign Central High School
(217) 351-3911

Spanish Story Time


Dear Ann,

The Spanish Story Time program at IPA has been rescheduled. Below are the final dates for the 3 Unit 4 Schools.

To make plans we need the notification by email (amsseu@illinois.edu) from the students who will volunteer,  at least two days before the program.

October 5 - 9
2015
GARDEN HILLS ELEMENTARY HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK 2015
Latin American Story Time

MONDAY
Oct 5


9:05- 9:45
K
Spanish-English

9:50 – 10:30
K
Spanish-English
1:25 – 2:05
K
Spanish-English

TUESDAY
Oct 6


9:05- 9:45
1st grade
Spanish-English
9:50 – 10:30
1st grade
Spanish-English


WEDNESDAY
Oct 7


9:05- 9:45
1st Grade
Spanish-English



9:50 – 10:30
2nd grade
Spanish-English
1:25 – 2:05
2nd grade
Spanish-English
2:10 – 2:50
2nd grade
Spanish-English
Thursday
Oct 8



1:25 – 2:05
2nd  & 3rd grade
Spanish-English
2:10 – 2:50
K
Spanish-English

October
12-14
2015
IPA HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK
Spanish Story Time


Monday 10/12
Tuesday
10/13
Wednesday
10/14
Thursday
10/15
Friday
10/16
8:00-8:40
Spanish-English
Fradkin class
Beringer class
Kolumban class


9:00-9:40
Spanish-English
Steinman class
Tideman class
Castro class


10:00-10:40
Spanish-English
Halpern class
Salaiza class
Giger class


12:20-1:00
Spanish-English
Behrends class
Jin class
Howell class





October 19-23
2015
WESTVIEW ELEMENTARY HISPANIC HERITAGE WEEK
Latin American Story Time
MONDAY
Oct 19

1st grade
8:40-9:20
Spanish-English
10:45-11:25
Portuguese/Engl
Elis Artz

12:25-1:05
Spanish-English


TUESDAY
Oct 20

3rd grade
7:55-8:35
Spanish-English

10:55-11:35
Portuguese/Engl
Elis Artz

1:10-1:50
Spanish-English

WEDNESDAY
Oct 21

5th grade

10:10-10:50
Spanish-English


1:10-1:50
Spanish-English

THURSDAY
Oct 22

4th grade
7:55-8:35
Spanish-English

10:10-10:50
Spanish-English


1:10-1:50
Portuguese/Engl
Elis Artz
FRIDAY
Oct 23

Kindergarten



2nd grade
8:40-9:20
Spanish-English

10:10-10:50
Spanish-English

11:40-12:20
Spanish-English



9:25-10:05
Spanish-English
10:55-11:35
Spanish-English


1:10-1:50
Spanish-English


Muchas gracias,

Alejandra

Alejandra S-Seufferheld
Outreach and FLAS Coordinator
Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS)
202 ISB | MC-481 | 910 S. Fifht Street | Champaign, IL 61820
Ph: 217.244.2790 | amsseu@illinois.edu

Reflection

After attending and participating in the community service event, please complete the following reflection exercise.

1.   Write a minimum of 400 words, double-spaced, using one-inch margins and Times New Roman, 12 point font.
2.   Write in English.
3.   Write a strong title.
4.   Within the reflection, cover all three of the following points. You don’t have to answer these specific questions; they are here to guide your thinking.
a.   What? Describe what you did in the community. Include relevant details. These can include dialogue, descriptions, anecdotes, etc.
b.   So what? Analyze what you saw and heard. What did you learn? What questions did your experience raise for you? What concerned you? Was anything you have learned in this or other classes pertinent to this experience?
c.   Now what? Now that you have used your Spanish in this kind of community setting, what does that change? Will you seek out more opportunities of this kind? Does this make you want to continue with your language learning? Did you notice any particular strengths or weaknesses of yours that you could work on?
5.   The reflection is due the last day of classes (before final exams). However, it is best to complete the reflection while the experience is still fresh in your mind.